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Meeting Robotization and Automation Challenge of the Ubiquitous Society: Towards Infinite Possibility Frontiers?

Technological and in broad sense ubiquitous revolution is today delivering a world of opportunity and leisure. Today computer technology is cheap. People are expensive. Computers are becoming smaller and smaller, and can be attached, embedded or blended to almost all things from man-made to natural ones in the world. During ubiquitous revolution computers become integrated parts of these things instead of independent individual artifacts. Due to the attachment, embedment and blending as well as emerging ubiquitous networks, ordinary things surrounding us are capable of (1) computing and communicating, (2) connecting and/or being connected to each other, and (3) behaving and acting rationally with some smartness or intelligence. Smart ubiquitous machines and robots are so called “everywhere” systems.

But this kind of new technological opportunity will not be delivered to all. For many people coming ubiquitous tech revolution will deliver misery and decline. Because of economic cost structures many workers will be replaced by the new technologies over the coming decades. Robots and automation mean silent revolution in many work places and societies. The economics of this new world will be revolutionary.

One big problem of this revolutionary technology wave is that our policy makers do not understand it. They are not understanding, what is happening when computers and robots are doing most of the work. This means that our world has the potential to become immeasurably wealthier and richer. It is up to us to decide who will benefit and how the benefits of ubiquitous revolution should be distributed and redistributed. The basic dynamics of the cyber age creates many open windows for us.

The advance of science and technology is offering us a gift. But do we know how to receive it? The gift could be nothing less than prosperity for all. More wealth is available for not just those people who are able to grab it for themselves. Big link to prosperity to wealth has been the job. New technologies are powerful creators of jobs, until the moment it becomes mature and breaks free of human involvement. Many technologies have an infant age, an adolescent age, a mature stage and finally an old age. This technological cycle create promises, but need constant care and attention. During this technology cycle many jobs are created. New technologies open new horizons, but they also destroy some old structures and models of behavior. Some innovations are also disruptive, not constructive.

In its mature stage the old technology is well understood and can fend for itself. It does not require assistance to get on with its work. Jobs are eliminated but it still delivers the goods. However, in its old age old technology is subject to attack and replacements. This cycle is a typical process of capitalism. Capitalism can only be understood as an evolutionary process of continuous innovation and creative destruction as Joseph Schumpeter defined it.

B. Joseph Pine II and Kim C. Korn (2011) have presented a big vision of future technologies in their book “Infinite Possibility”. They see that ubiquitous revolution will create for us infinite frontier concerning the progression on economic value. Customization and commoditization of goods, services, experiences and transformations are key activities in this process of “infinite possibility”. The digital frontier provides us many possibilities in the universe, where time, space and matter create many alternative possibilities.
Real and virtual spaces are creating one interesting dimension of the space. Atoms and bits are creating second key dimension of the matter. Thirdly, actual and autonomous time is third critical dimension of the time. These 3 dimensions of time, matter and space create new frontiers for wealth creation and innovative solutions in economies and societies.

To understand the scale and scope of new possibilities in these 3 dimensions can help us to create more wealth and more jobs in the future. Infinite possibility is not gross overstatement. It is analogical to LEGO brick game, a simple thing of material substance, which is genuinely immeasurable, and truly limitless.

Now need bohemian creativity to build our own LEGO games of the future. This means that we must be ready to build up new technological innovation, new business innovation and new social innovations for a society with new technological infrastructures and settings. We must be able to create modular and systemic innovations, which are really reshaping human futures.

Index
1 Ubiquitous robot
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubiquitous_robot
2 Joseph Schumpeter
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schumpeter
3. Infinite possibility paradigm
Pine II, B. Joseph and Korn, Kim C. (2011) Infinite Possibility. Creating Customer Value on the Digital Frontier. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers Ltd.
4. LEGO thinking
Gregersen, Hal, Dyer, Jeff and Christensen, Clayton M. (2012) Book excerpt: How strong are your Lego thinking skills? April 27th, 2012. Web: http://smartblogs.com/leadership/2012/04/27/book-excerpt-how-strong-are-your-lego-thinking-skills/

Cultural Mediocrity and Bohemians as Change Makers of Organizational Cultures

Bohemian persons are often feeling otherness, and often they feels they are in some way misunderstood. A bohemian, who do not fit the typical “average” category, has many challenges and problems, because this “average” category is considered in many organizations the only right category. Many talented people have to deal with the fringes of society in order to realize their dreams and visions.

In many cases bohemians are neglected because of “work place democracy”. However, we know that the limitations of democracy lie in the moral, and even spiritual, quality of the electorate. A democracy is as good as its people and tends to promote a moral and cultural mediocrity. One paradox of today is that modern democratic society seems to be characterized by a rising tide of trivia and empty entertainment. Ordinary citizens may want more, but also bohemians want more, much more.

For many organizations it is typical that they allow the bold thinking only in specific circumstances. Courage to break with can be taken in general in the context of “development Days”, “creativity workshops” or “spring assembly events”. On other days of a year bohemian experts will be “hippies”, “nerds” and “persons with propeller hats”. They are the ones all other in the “organizational chart” can laugh at good will. For a bohemian it is typical that they are not taken particularly seriously or other experts underestimate their performances.

When one talks about bohemians, there are often presented different characterizations of a bohemian person. Typical classifications for bohemians are:

• The diversity of competences,
• spontaneity,
• robustness
• living in the moment,
• artistry,
• ambivalence, and ambivertism,
• the ability to be inspired,
• vagary,
• angularity,
• roughness, and
• a strong character.

These characterizations are certainly in the right direction to characterize the bohemian tribe. In the reality, however, bohemians can be found from very different social and ethnic origins. Bohemians may be both men and women, as well as a bohemian can also be found in different age groups. Actually, there is no single psychological standard definition for the bohemian people. Bohemians are special kinds of people who also want emphasize the specificity of their own.

Bohemian man can be extroverted, but there are also inward-looking bohemians, not so expressive. Bohemian people work very often in creative professions and have broad innovative potential of the toughest technical and social applications. Art, science, sports, and economic life are attractive fields of life for bohemians. Bohemians can provide creative contributions to these important areas of life.

A bohemian is a person who is often not suitable for the average person’s profile. Bohemians often want to consciously stand out from the masses and have different social contexts and “tribes”. People see and perceive bohemians usually strange – even the difficult people to handle. The authenticity and the inner voice, listening oneself are important things for bohemians. Bohemian people are generally interested in unconventional ideas and novel practices. They are interested in new ideas, inventions and proposals.

Generally, they are often called to invent and re-invent different policy areas and to be pioneers of new ideas and ideologies.
In many organizations, bohemian life style is a challenge and many organizations have difficulties to rigid adapt organizational systems and relationships to bohemian styles. Many corporate organizations and public sector organizations want – consciously or unconsciously – to recruit – not so bohemian employees, who work quietly to make standards things and projects routinely and in a mechanical way like in old industrial organizations. In the future, these types of people and organizations trying to be mechanic robots and robot societies will be easily substituted with robots and new smart technologies.

Many organizations are also such that bohemians cannot easily present their new ideas and take active initiatives on new challenges. Rigid hierarchies and inflexible organizational silos prevent organizations from obtaining access to the best creative human capital. New, bohemian types of organizations are first facing major challenges to do the right thing. If bohemian personalities are allowed to take creative and new roles and flexible job descriptions, they also tend to engage actively in these roles and job descriptions.

Bohemian persons are able to change schemata in the organizations. Schemata, whether plural of schema, are knowledge structures a person forms from past experiences. Bohemian can create new forms of schemata and reformulate old schemata.

Incentive structures of bohemian organizations are different compared with industrial organizations of Taylorism. “Synthesized workflows” approach of Taylorism is not the right approach to create unique products and services. So called “scientific management” must be reformulated, if we want to keep members of creative class inside the box of scientific management. This challenge is not a small one. We must re-define organizational paradigms, control systems, organizational structures, power structures, symbols, organizational rituals and routines. Even stories and myths of organizations must be re-invented.

For many business organizations would do well to think about it they are able to offer reasonable opportunities for bohemian talents to make a special contribution in their organization. Without re-inventing their organizational systems, leadership patterns and management styles this will be a mission impossible. Why organizational cultures develop in organizations is due to external adaptation and internal integration. Bohemian people play a special role both in external adaptation process and internal integration process. That is why bohemians´ role cannot be neglected in the post-modern organizations. External adaptation reflects an evolutionary approach to organizational culture. Internal integration is an important function since social structures are required for organizations to exist. Thus bohemians are key players from the evolutionary and functional organizational perspectives. Bohemians can create strong cultures inside organizations. The “average approach” leads to weak culture. Weak culture means that there is little alignment with organizational values and control must be exercised through extensive procedures and bureaucracy. Strong culture is said to exist where staff respond to stimulus because of their alignment to organizational values.

If the organization’s culture is too “average oriented” and favors “middle of the road” recruitments, bohemians of the creative class do not offer their unique talents to such organizational structures and cultures. In this old-fashioned organizational culture scenario, they will have to seek new dynamic organizations or start-up their own businesses. General and very typical assumption is that the workers should be as robots. This approch will not help to attract bohemian talents, because they do not want to be like robots. Permissiveness, tolerance and deeper cultural understanding of diversity are important issues for organizations that really want to get top experts and keep them in their organizations.

Index

1 Beyond mediocrity
Web: http://www.dharmalife.com/issue15/comment.html
2 Organizational culture
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organizational_culture
3 Schemata
Mandler, J. M. (1984) Stories, Scripts, and Scenes: Aspects of Schema Theory. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Widmayer, Sharon Alayne (2012) Schema Theory: An Introduction. George Mason University.
Web: http://www.mrjthompson.com/Documents/SchemaTheory.pdf
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schema_(psychology)
4 Organization research
Handy, Charles B. (1976) Understanding Organizations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Barney, J. B. (1986) Organizational culture: Can it be a source of sustained competitive advantage?. Academy of Management Review, 11(3), pp. 656-665.
Shein, Edgar (1992) Organizational Culture and Leadership: A Dynamic View. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Zhang, Xibao (2009) Values, Expectations, Ad Hoc Rules, and Culture Emergence in International Cross Cultural Management Contexts. New York: Nova Science Publishers.
5 Frederick Winslow Taylor
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_Winslow_Taylor
6 Scientific management
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_management

Challenging Futures of Human Beings and Creative Class: Visions of Robots, Bohemians, Bohemian Robots and Robotized Bohemians

The concept of robotization was presented in 1927. Robotization is the process of turning a human being into a robot. Close synonyms of robotization are mechanization and automation. In the on-going process of robotization humans will be made persons who are machinelike, as in giving responses or performing work. Robotized assembly lines are good examples of robotization. Robotization has not reached saturation point.

Just as William Whyte’s 1956 classic book The Organization Man showed how the organizational ethos of that industrial age permeated every aspect of life, Richard Florida described a society in which the creative ethos is increasingly dominant. The rise of creative class is today´s reality in the global economy. Millions of people are beginning to work and live much as creative types like artists and scientists always have done. This “creative class” is found in a variety of business fields, art to science, research to development, biotech to education, from engineering to theater, and architecture to small business. In this way the scale and scope of bohemian cultures is broadening. In the future, members of the creative class will determine how workplaces are organized, what companies will prosper or go bankrupt, and even which cities will thrive or wither. Bohemians of the creative class are really important social group. Our mind sights, core values, tastes, our personal relationships, our choices of where to live, and even our sense and use of time are changing radically.

Now robotization is coming to other business and societal areas, to more complex work tasks, even to the works of creative class. For example, robotization of war and robotization of many welfare health services are going on. In the field of information technology applications, ubiquitous technologies make robotization more intensive and fast. Robots will be combinations of hardware and software. Ubiquitous technologies combine hardware and software systems.

Now, it is actual situation to reflect what human´s destiny is in the highly robotized society. Reorganization of the labor market is in front of us. For example, we can just ask, what China and India will do with the on-going robotization process?
Bohemians are very different compared to bohemians. Bohemians are not as obedient as robots. An obedient worker is still the ideal employee compared to the bohemian workers. Bohemian employees are expected to be more sick leaves compared with the robots. Robots need just technical maintainers. People need more extensive support services, for example, occupational health services and holidays. Robots do not go crazy. Robots can also work on weekends. So robots are having a lot of advantages compared to the bohemian people.

In the robotized society leadership, management and strategies will change significantly. The term “singularity” was coined by science fiction writer Vernor Vinge, who argues that artificial intelligence, human biological enhancement or brain-computer interfaces could be possible causes of the singularity. Especially people’s own self-management strategies and models will be important issues. The big challenge of post-modern societies is the thorough preparation of the fact that robots are superior workers compared to humans. We can reasonably argue that in the conditions of robotization, people should become even more human, unique and special. Man cannot survive in the competition with robots in other way than by highlighting her/his own special human characters.

Actually all the humans will face a strong pressure to be more bohemians, very special persons. A bohemian robot is a future vision, which is not so easy to engineer or re-engineer. Avoiding becoming an average is a big challenge for people in the robotized industries and business life. Always some of the medium must be matched. This problem will remain.

A bohemian robot is less likely to be the future mission that a robotized bohemian. Actually both “robot” missions are still challenging. We can expect that in the futures there will be all the variations of robotization.

And machine intelligence, a product of human design, will be far more intelligent than its human creator. Thus, there will be bohemians, robots and robotized bohemians and bohemian robots. How long this process takes, is still an open question.

Technological singularity refers to the hypothetical future emergence of greater-than-human intelligence through technological means, very probably resulting in explosive super-intelligence. Singularity expert and scholar Raymond Kurzweil notes that the expected milestone year will be 2045 in terms of when he expects computer-based intelligences to significantly exceed the sum total of human brainpower.

Kurzweil predicts also that silicon-based life forms with the thinking capacity of humans should start arriving on the scene around 2029. This technological forecasting estimate is based on Kurzweil’s theory of “time and chaos,” which suggests that evolutionary time is accelerating. To sum up, there are very good reasons to think the future of robotized society. The bohemian alternative is one way to create counter forces and alternatives for a robotized society.

Index
1 Robotization
Web: http://www.wordswarm.net/dictionary/robotization.html
Web: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/robotization
2 Robotization of war
Web: http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=27529
3 Willian H. Whyte
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_H._Whyte
4 The Organization Man
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Organization_Man
5 Richard Florida
Web: http://www.creativeclass.com/richard_florida
6 Creative Class
Florida, Richard (2002) The Rise of Creative Class. And How it’s Transforming Work, Leisure, Community and Everyday Life. New York: Perseus Book Group.
Florida, Richard (2005) The Flight of the Creative Class: The New Global Competition for Talent. HarperBusiness, HarperCollins.
Hoyman, Michele & Faricy, Christopher (2009) It takes a village: A test of the creative class. Social capital and human capital theories. Urban Affairs Review. Vol. 44, pp. 311-333.
7 Raymond Kurzweil
Web: http://fi.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raymond_Kurzweil
8 Vernor Vinge
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernor_Vinge
9 Technological singularity
Kurzweil, Raymond (1999) The Age of Spiritual Machines. New York: Viking.
Kurzweil, Raymond (2005) The Singularity is Near. Penguin Group.

The Trans-media Challenge, Ubiquitous Technology and New Bohemian Culture of Creative Class

Trans-media Challenge, Ubiquitous Technology and New Bohemian Culture of Creative Class

A key element of creative work is storytelling. Today many media channels are interconnected. In the future media channels are even more linked and interconnected because of ubiquitous technologies, machines and robots. Trans-media storytelling is a technique of telling novel stories across multiple formats and platforms. Trans-media storytelling is also known in some communication contexts as multi-platform storytelling, cross-platform storytelling, or trans-media narrative. Ubiquitous technologies make this kind of trans-mediation possible.

Many platforms are today a part of social media. In the future they will be a part of ubiquitous media. Traditional media formats like TV, radio, video, game, film, magazine and newspaper are today facing new challenges of trans-media development. Already now many movies like “Year Zero” are trans-media projects. The new internet solutions and applications Web 2.0, Web 3.0 and Web 4.0 will lead us to new kind of internet era. Especially for creative class and for journalism emerging trans-media is a big challenge, which changes work life and work culture.

Ubiquitous technology is not a neutral trend for societies. It will change many things, leading in an extreme form to technological singularity. As we know technological singularity refers to the hypothetical future emergence of greater-than-human intelligence through technological means, very probably resulting in explosive super intelligence. In this kind of techno society humans must develop new social positions, different from the positions of robots and super intelligent systems. We can expect that new kind of social and cultural structures will emerge.

Humans cannot compete with super intelligence, where already now new markets are in conditions of hyper-competition. Technology historically has fostered agility. Hyper-competition results from the dynamics of strategic maneuvering amongst competitors and from new technologies. Strategic maneuvering is more and more based on robotics and super intelligence. Many experts criticize these kinds of developments, especially in financial markets, where robotized gambling casinos without any rules (or not many rules) are possible to be run.

Many futurists say that it is very difficult or impossible for present-day humans to predict what a post-singularity world would be like. Raymond Kurzweil has discussed about this topic widely. However, we can expect that human beings must define their relationship to super intelligent systems and robots. Many complex ethical issues need answers.

The start of ubiquitous era means that we shall need new social innovations, which define new rules of societies. Also new business and technology innovations are needed to manage change in this kind of environment. We can also expect that the time of average is going to be over, because robots define the code of average from new technological pre-conditions. Accordingly, humans must re-define their positions from this novel perspective.
Ubiquitous technology development means also that the borders between real reality and virtual reality become vague. In real environments actual events, material substances and real places matter. In virtual environments virtual places, digital substances and autonomous events matter. The new trans-media emerges when these 6 key real and virtual elements will be linked by ubiquitous technologies and tech applications.

This is a future vision of global trans-media.

The trans-media includes both real and virtual elements. Authenticity will be a strategic key issue in the experience society, which is the next society after service economy. In the experience economy attention is scarce, time is limited and money is consumable. These are also the basic rules of trans-media.

There seems to be more questions than answers concerning our common future. Creative class members and especially bohemian persons are probably finding new answers more probably than the “average class”. One working hypothesis is that robots will destroy the “labor class” in the future. If this hypothesis holds, it means that population rich countries will face the era of mass employment. Also other smaller countries will have social and economic problems, because local and global markets do not work well. How much this process takes time, is another open question.

Humans have an obvious challenge: to be creative persons who find answers to open questions. People are forced to find the bohemian element of their minds.

Index

1 Social media
Safko, Lon & Brake, David (2010) The Social Media Bible , Tools & Strategies for Business Success. Tactics Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley.
2 Trans-media
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmedia
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmedia_storytelling

3 Year Zero
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_Zero_(game)
4 Internet evolution: Web 1.0, Web 2.0, Web 3.0 & Web 4.0
Web: http://www.marcuscake.com/economic-development/internet-evolution
5 Singularity
Good, I. J. (1965) Speculations Concerning the First Ultraintelligent Machine. In Franz L. Alt and Morris Rubinoff (Ed.) Advances in Computers. Academic Press 6: pp. 31–88.
Kurzweil, Ray (2005) The Singularity is Near. New Jersey, USA: Penguin Group.
Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technological_singularity
Tainter, Joseph (1988) The Collapse of Complex Societies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
6 Raymond Kurzweil
Web: http://www.kurzweilai.net/
7 Ubiquitous technology
Jurvansuu, Marko (2011) Roadmap to a Ubiquitous World: Where the Difference Between Real and Virtual Is Blurred. VTT Research Notes 2574. VTT: Helsinki.
Web: http://www.vtt.fi/inf/pdf/tiedotteet/2011/T2574.pdf
Web: http://sandbox.xerox.com/ubicomp/
8 Creative class
Florida, R. (2002). The Rise of the Creative Class: And How it’s Transforming Work, Leisure, Community and Everyday Life. New York: Perseus Book Group.
Rindermann, Heiner & Thompson, James (2011) Cognitive capitalism: The effect of cognitive ability on wealth, as mediated through scientific achievement and economic freedom. Psychological Science 22 (6), pp. 754-763.
9 Hypercompetition
D’Aveni, Richard (1997) Waking up to the New Era of Hypercompetition. The Washington Quarterly, pp. 183–195.
Plant, R. (2006) Hypercompetition and differentiation. Web: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/archetype/archive/2006/07/24/677222.aspx
10 Robotized gambling
Web: http://www.innovationnewsdaily.com/565-human-traders-automated-extinction-markets.html

Innovation Flow: A Process of Making a Difference

One of the most puzzling mysteries of contemporary culture is how do changes in style and taste come about? Who are those people creating changes? There are some predictable socio-cultural patterns behind trends which shape our futures.
F. Scott Fitzgerald, the famous “boho of jazz swing time”, noted:

The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function.

Boho people are able to live with paradoxes and ambiguities. The rational one variable model is not a key issue for the bohos. Without bohos, it is not possible to lead an organization towards excellence because excellence requires the ability to live with paradoxes and ambiguities. Bohos can live easily with ad hoc groups, playfulness, temporary structures, hubs, unusual weak signals, technology of foolishness, shadow organizations, skunk works, cabals, wild cards and unjustified variations.
We know that trend creators and trend setters are not the most conventional people. Often they are bohemians (bohos), or geeks or even freaks. They are extremely innovative and inventive. They are not prisoners of the past. They are children of the future. They invent the future. That is why Richard Florida and other city researchers have invented “tolerance index” because they have found that bohos are needed for innovations, development and economic growth. The bohos create the bohemian city.

These groups of people are not big groups, but they are small special groups in our society. Trend creators are not homogenous group, they are very special personalities. The anatomy of emerging trends is based on trend creators and trend setters. There are both micro and macro trends. Some people create new ideas and inventions and trendsetters want to adopt these ideas and inventions.

These two special groups are at the very top of the trend model. Very often these groups are having many bohemian people – people who do things in a different way – going “out of box”. “Out of the box” is an expression that describes nonconformal, creative thinking. These people are responsible for creating or doing something special that can offset the trend.

Trend creators and trendsetters must have the potential skill that is the basis for both emotional and social intelligence. The mind involves a flow of energy and information. Some people talk about the innovation flow. Innovation flow is a psychological issue, the foundation of all innovations. It is a very interesting psychological issue, because it is a fundamental source of new ideas and inventions. Energy is the capacity to carry out an action. Energy is moving out limbs or it is an embowering though. Ability “to do stuff” is a key issue for changes in our society. Energy, information and innovation are inter-related issues in an innovation flow process.

There are many forms of human energy. We can feel radiant energy when we sit in the sun. We can use kinetic energy when we walk on the sunny beach or go for a swim. We can utilize neural energy when we think or when we talk or listen, or when we read. By definition information is anything that symbolizes something other than itself. Energy and information are complementary things in a dynamic innovation process. Without energy and information it is not possible to develop new ideas and introduce new inventions. Energy and information go hand in hand in the movement of our mind and mindsets. Our minds regulate innovation flow as well as energy and information flows. We can feel the reality of these two forms of mental experience.

We can feel energy levels and rich information flow. These two critical elements, energy and information are always present in an innovation process. We can even claim that energy and information flows create innovation flow. Because they change across time, we can sense their movement from one movement to the next movement in a dynamic, fluid and moving process. The mind´s regulation creates new pattern of energy and information flow.

Thus, we are not just observing these moving processes. We are both monitoring and modifying. The mind is real. Also our mindsights are real. The mind is a regulatory process. The mindset is creating many regulatory processes. Without strong mindsight, life becomes deadened.

It is possible to create a culture where mindsight is absent. In this kind of society we can become stuck in the physical domain, blind to the internal reality at the heart of our lives. In this kind of society no new ideas and inventions are created. Blind minds cannot lead the change. A blind mind cannot lead other blind minds. We must have bright minds and mindsets. Bright minds with energy and information flows are the foundation of innovations and innovation dynamics.

Thus, big challenge of innovation management will be deeper understanding of innovation dynamics of contemporary network organizations, fast companies and mega corporations. Understanding innovation flow, bohos, boho team dynamics and the origins of trends will be long and fascinating intellectual journey for us.

Sources
Innovation Flow
1 Web: http://innovationflow.blogspot.com/
Swing
2 Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swing_music
F. Scott Fitzgerald
3 Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F._Scott_Fitzgerald
Paradox
4 Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox
Ambiquity
5 Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambiguity
Ad hoc
6 Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad_hoc
Weak signal
7 Mendonça, S., Cunha, M.P., Kaivo-oja, J. & Ruff, F. (2004) Wild Cards, Weak Signals and Organisational Improvisation. Futures. The Journal of Forecasting, Planning and Policy, Vol. 36, Issue 2, pp. 201-218.
Hub
8 Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hub
Out of box
9 Web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thinking_outside_the_box
Mindsight
10 Siegel, D.J. (2010) Mindsight: The New Science of Personal Transformation. New York: Random House.
Dan Siegel
11 Web: http://drdansiegel.com/
Trend
12 Vejlgaard, H. (2008) Anatomy of a Trend. New York: McGraw-Hill.

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